Tugger the SLUGger!SLUG Mailing List Archives

Re: [SLUG] Wht the Old Junk in New *nix?


Andrew Reilly wrote:
> 
> Sounds like your configuration is sprained.  I haven't had a
> delete key configuration problem for years.

I was basically letting off steam about my experiences with various
Linux distros (RH, Debian, Slackware mostly).

Debian Slink was by far the best wrt consistency of bs/del. I'm yet to
compare it to Debian Potato properly. RedHat (5.2) and Slackware (3.1)
didn't look like they even bothered to make an effort.

If your delete key works in all cases, you have probably configured it
yourself and not touched it for years.

> That _is_ a dumb thing to do, though, because emacs doesn't
> offer a full terminal discipline.  It's a shell command emitter,
> more like a teletype than a CRT.  If you want to run vi under
> emacs (and I do this myself from time to time) use viper mode.

It's not a dumb thing to do, it's an inquisitive thing to do. I'm
learning emacs at the moment (have always been a vi/vim user) and
basically wanted to see if it was possible.

> > Historical reasons aside though, is there any reason
> > why Linux shouldn't buck the trend and be consistent?
> 
> Sure: there are probably a zillion (well, at least a few) small
> businesses and third-world setups running on hand-me-down
> hardware: wyse dumb terminals and so on, with a Linux server
> doing all of the work.  That's a perfectly reasonable way for a
> small office to do productive work for essentially no setup
> cost.  You'll find that every single one of the available dumb
> terminals deals with the backspace/delete issue differently.
> Almost none of them have Alt/Meta keys (some don't even have
> escape keys).

I'm not saying that we should drop support for old equipment. I'm saying
that keyboard configuration should be done in a single place, and all
programs should get their key interpretation from that configuration.
This doesn't have to exclude the use of Wyse terminals etc. They would
still have their own configurations.

Matthew